Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Back to Landscape Studies...for now

Working on three pieces in one day? I don't recommend it! Makes you crazy with paint fumes and driven until your body says, "Hey. You're not taking care of yourself!" Here are two of those studies. I'm liking these two subjects. They provide some dramatic lighting as I try to learn how to transfer impressions into paint. This is proving more challenging than I had thought. I wish I could travel more. Wish I had more energy. I'd paint twelve hours a day. 6" x 8" and 5" x 7" oil on panels. The second one is available on ebay.



Oh, but the critical mind is so very, very tough. Reminds me that the more one paints, the quieter that left brain criticism becomes.
Yet, even a few days away can limit creativity!

A question from Writing About Art, "Who creates 'meaning'--artist or viewer?" Roy Lichtenstein is quoted as saying, "I wouldn't believe anything I tell you." Today, I will consider this to be my left brain's cautionary note...

5 comments:

Jeffrey J. Boron said...

Love your bold use of colour and the graphic design of your work Melinda. Wonderful art!!

Jeffrey

Melinda said...

Thank you, Jeffrey, for stopping by and leaving your gracious comment! I hope you'll be back. For desert dwellers, you live in a paradise and we dream of forests and water...

Edgar said...

Hey,
I love both these new paintings! The lower one, with the bold, flat mountains is cool: the cactus in the foreground looks like embroidery. The little bit of blending going on in the upper one is just sweet. And by sweet, I mean the bomb. The whole painting is well-integrated, and the brushwork is nicely consistent from the foreground, through the mountains up to the sky and clouds.

Edgar said...

... and about your question: "Who creates 'meaning'...?"

This is the chicken or the egg question, just posed differently, and I know the answer to that one: It's the egg.

Edgar said...

I can't help but to keep saying how great this painting looks! It looks like a big painting. And it's so restful, in a "journey into the land" kind of restful way.