Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Monks' Quarters, Tumacacori Mission, Arizona

Taking a short break from the Grand Canyon today. I've wanted to play with some images that I have from visiting the Mission at Tumacacori awhile back.

Tumacacori Mission was established by the Spanish Jesuit priest, Father Kino, in 1691. The day we were there, women from the local Tohono O'odham tribe were making sopapillas (deep fried tortillas, sprinkled with powdered sugar). We arrived late in the afternoon and were able to see a pretty nice sunset. I'm hoping to try painting the west side next.

This painting is 16" x 20" on a Blick artist's board. This is of the Monks' quarters just to the east side of the mission building. It has some buttressing in the front as it's a mud adobe structure compromised by water (hmmm. That sounds familiar). I wonder now if it's been closed due to the recent budget cuts...

23 comments:

Salon Delucca said...

beautiful colors Melinda and the light - really wonderful :)

Melinda said...

Thank you, Jeane! I've missed pink after working on the Grand Canyon painting lately.

Barbara Muir said...

Hi Melinda,

This is so stunningly good that I nearly had a heart attack looking at it. It was definitely an OH MY situation (that's me exclaiming). So wonderful.

Yowser!

Keep the excitement coming.

xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxBarbara

Melinda said...

Wow, Barbara. Thank you. I was having an attack of doubt about it, thinking that it might be one of those 'bad' paintings.

Okay. You've unleashed the splashy/drippy/spritzy paint woman...

Virtual hugs galore.

Kathleen Krucoff said...

Hi Melinda,

I found your blog via Karen Phipps and this painting really captured my attention. It's beautiful. As I explored your blog, I just love the Grand Canyon Meditation. The warm colors you use are luscious. Lovely work.

Melinda said...

Welcome, Kathleen! Thank you so much for your comment. I really appreciate your taking the time to come by and have a look.

You know, I started out in stained glass many, many years ago. Every once in awhile I get a hankerin' to break some glass. I just visited your blog and am impressed with your hot glass work. I've never worked with fusing before.

Hope to hear from you again!

cohen labelle said...

I love your painting Melinda. The colour is so visceral and gorgeous. I love that.
xo, Marcia

Melinda said...

Oh, thank you, Marcia!

Visceral. I love that word and think it quite the compliment. It was a big change to be so loose, but I've needed it to balance out my meditations...

Virtual hugs to you!!

Anonymous said...

Yummy colors and juicy paint. What could be better! How do you like the Blick Artists Boards? Do they come pre-gessoed like the Ampersand?

Melinda said...

Thank you, Jana. I'm loving the artist's boards. They are pretty much the same (pre-gessoed) as the Ampersand, just Blick's version, I think.

Wish they made them larger, though.

Linny D. Vine said...

Thank-you for painting such beautiful paintings with both your paint brushes and your words, Melinda. From my side of the Grand Canyon I think that adobes are entirely exotic and romantic.

Jeffrey J. Boron said...

I love the way your work seems so free Melinda! As well I enjoy how the south west is always there!
Good one!!!

Jeffrey

Anonymous said...

The complimentary colors work so well against each other to make a lovely harmonious and interesting work.
Jean

Melinda said...

You're very kind, Linny, and I thank you for your generous comment.

I don't want to be misleading. Adobe homes are pretty rare in Tucson too. In the late sixties it was considered low class to live in mud houses and many were torn down to be replaced by frame and stucco homes.
We were very fortunate to squeak into this place just before the big real estate boom started in the late '90s. And, of course, our place is a mix of three: mud adobe, frame and stucco and straw bale in-fill.

How I wish we could build all homes to be as energy efficient as adobe and straw bale!

Melinda said...

Oh, I like that, Jeffrey...free! How I dream of being free with paint every time. Will keep trying.

Thank you!

Melinda said...

Thank you, Jean! Changing palette on this, taking a break from the Grand Canyon, was challenging.

SamArtDog said...

I keep going back to look at this. I knew I liked it a lot and finally figured out the fascination. Your splashy self's paintings are like handwriting. Love the impulsive looseness!

Joan Breckwoldt said...

Ahhh, it's beautiful. I always look forward to seeing what you've painted, I know it'll make me happy!
Joan

Melinda said...

Wow. Thank you so much, SamArtDog. I see what you're seeing. I like that. Gestural. Like writing--like signature. It's a nice change from controlled painting.

This is how I see you, by the way-- Authentic/gestural, having a unique signature.

Karen said...

What I find most intriguing here is the fact that the structure seems fairly flat in the way you've painted it, and yet there is this great depth between it and its background. really , really interesting the way it reads.
Oh yes, and the color! :)

Melinda said...

Why, thank you, Karen! In real life, the structure does seem to have, well, structure, which fascinates me too. I slapped down paint and then wiped away in some areas, producing lights. This seems to have given it the illusion of weight and structure.

It might be the lightness behind and in the mountains, plus the light sky that creates the illusion of distance.

I always appreciate your careful looking! Hope you're keeping warm. We're supposed to get lots of rain tomorrow. Whoo-hoo!!

loriann signori said...

Absolutely beautiful colors on this one..wow!

Melinda said...

Thank you, Loriann! This one has gone back to the manufacturing plant and is awaiting a fresh coat of paint. Hope I don't lose the feel.