Thursday, July 23, 2009

Thrill is Gone, Grounded Once Again

You know it's just not possible to float indefinitely in the land of art euphoria. Yup. It's true. I know you know this.

We've had a major computer virus that lasted a few days--that kept us all hoppin' and waiting. Now fix-ed, as you can see. Whew. Then, a few days ago, as I was about to start a new painting, I noticed that the window AC was leaking water over my art storage cabinet. This is the tough part. There were losses. Only a few pieces were beyond saving, but some monotypes will have to be trimmed down to the images because of the mold damage. Tonight, the salvageable work is in the bathtub soaking in a bit of bleach water. Oh yeah, my nice, black 3/4 sleeve, boatneck shirt is now decorated with bleach stains. Oh well, I've re-dyed clothing before.

So, back to work and back to earth after a few days of high flying fun at the museum.

Traveling around today, looking at all the great work at your blogs, is so encouraging that I'm not seriously disturbed by any of this, just delayed. But, I do have the following abstract that offers a direction as things dry out.


Study for "Moticos" #1 (36" x 36")

Wishing you better archiving!

17 comments:

Jeane Myers said...

Melinda, I love this piece! and alas - computer virus, water damage and ruined shirt - it can only get better :)

Melinda said...

I send virtual hugs your way! I'm counting on your prediction and am looking toward tomorrow...

kathrynlaw said...

So sorry about your losses and aggravations. And yes, the euphoria had to come to an end--the story about the painter who finally got the huge solo show and never painted again, recently referred to by Mr. ArtyFice, is from Art & Fear. But this big milestone of yours will have the opposite effect, no doubt, and that just means that NEXT euphoria closer every day! This is a promising start to the next piece!

Janelle Goodwin said...

Seems you've handled your recent glitches with grace, Melinda. Very cool painting - I really like it!

Melinda said...

Hi Kathryn,
Thank you, thank you. I appreciate your comment and the reference to Art & Fear. I could not remember where we had read the story. It was too sad, but there was a lesson in it for us all. It's nice to keep moving, knowing that every once in awhile there will be new euphoria to experience--like a splash of red on canvas, yes?

Melinda said...

Hi Janelle,
Mostly, I don't feel very graceful, but I'm working on it!

Thank you for your kind comment. Now I need to see travel on over and see how you're doing.

Barbara Muir said...

Oh my Melinda,

Beautiful painting! I'm so sorry about the damaged art. I've bleach spotted a few shirts cleaning sinks. They become painting sweaters, shirts, blouses. Houses tend to do strange and terrifying things to art.
You'll rise again -- probably tomorrow, and realize you are so great, there isn't really any such thing as setback.

xoxoxoxoxBarbara

Edgar said...

Melinda,
Hugs and good thoughts going your way.
If art is a Struggle, then you are a Warrior. Every warrior has setbacks or gets bogged in the mud, but you have what few achieve: a memorable success. To be remembered is the best a warrior can hope for, because in the end, even the wars are forgotten.
If art is Life, then you are a Fruiting Tree. The trees have bad seasons, pests(!), and good seasons, but no matter the circumstances, the trees focus on producing fruit, which nourishes the world while giving the tree a splinter of immortality. Some fruit will not sprout, some will rot, but even so, all will be used by the World for Good. This has been a blue ribbon year for your fruit, and the Orchard Keeper has said so. Don't sweat the ground fall.

Barbara Muir said...

Hi Melinda,

I love the fruit analogy that Edgar uses, and you may be able to salvage the ground fall. We have an apple tree, and I've been collecting the ground fall, trimming off the bruised bits, and making apple sauce. This has been a year of great events for you. Your work is magnificent and I feel certain that the whole world will soon acknowledge that. I guess without the downs, we wouldn't be able to rejoice quite so powerfully with the ups.

xoxoxoxoBarbara

Melinda said...

Thank you, Edgar. Good soldiers march on, right? Gotta keep movin' or I'll freeze up.

Looking forward to a happier garden, fer sure.

Melinda said...

Oh, I like that, Barbara. I like the analogy of the apples on the ground. I can see that trimming off the "bruised bits" (the moldy edges) of the monotypes will provide "sauce" for future work.

Virtual hugs! And, thank you for your kind words.

susan hong-sammons said...

Hello Melinda, I applaud your spirit in time of crisis and your latest posting. What a power house of an abstraction.

Karen said...

What an appropriate painting! hee hee. I also like that you put "bleach" as one of your tag words. Maybe your sense of humor is showing during a trying time? :)
Of course you will go on. And trust me that you can make all the lost pieces again, and BETTER.

Linny D. Vine said...

Melinda, you are a high flyer and you will be soaring again very soon! (And, I think it is wonderful how you are using your creativity to save your creations - my condolences on any losses.)
(I have to share that my word verification below is "chill" - how appropriate, in so many ways!)

Melinda said...

Thank you so much, Susan. I do have to develop this abstract just a little, though. It looks better on the monitor than in real life. Nice thing about that is that the monitor view helps one see the difference.

Melinda said...

You've got me smiling, Karen, with the reference to 'bleach' in the tag section. Yes, a little humor...

I love your words that future work will be even better. Really encouraging. Thank you! I do believe you're right. At least, I sure hope so!!

Melinda said...

Very good, Linny! That is a good word, "chill", for now. Trying...really. In fact, I'm finding old stuff, throwing out bad stuff, and revisiting ideas from, well, the last century. Hmmm.

The bleach did help a great deal. However, the mold stains in the margins of most of the monotypes remain. This is a lesson about letting the work go--letting other people have it, I think.